The South East Asia Center (SEAC) has launched an education initiative based on the Finnish model in 12 Thai schools, while trying to inspire widespread educational reform across the region.

The community-based, educational and social service organization announced its cooperation with Code School Finland. Aringya Thaloengsri, SEAC chief capability officer and managing director, says it had been carefully selected from 94 institutions around the world.

“With the strength of Finnish education, and this coding school’s reputation for a world-leading education model, I believe that the partnership can only help to improve and develop Thai educational standards, so our children have every opportunity to grow up to be quality adults and be prepared in every dimension for the working world.”

The curriculum not only focuses on hard skills such as coding, AI or robotics but also the soft skills such as learning techniques, critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, communication, business skills and user-centric ideas.

Jyri Järviaho, Finnish ambassador to Thailand, says this is a positive and timely step with education in its current state of flux.

“Finland has a long tradition of investing and developing its education system.”

In the Worldwide Education for the Future Index, Finland ranks number one.

You can read the full article by clicking HERE.

 

Songkran is the traditional Thai New Year. It is a celebration that embraces goodwill, love, compassion. and thankfulness, using water as the means of expression. The word Songkran derives from Sanskrit and means to move or step forward.

Songkran takes place when the sun moves from Pisces into Aries. It falls on 13-15 of April every year, marking the New Year, according to the Brahmin solar system.

The first Songkran day is known as Maha Songkran or the grand Songkran. 13 April is also declared the Day of the Senior or Elderly by the Thai government.

14 April is designated as Family Day to celebrate family love and togetherness.

15 April is the Thai New Year’s Day and it’s also the final day of Songkran celebrations in many parts of the country. Offerings are left at temples on this day to ring in the New Year, with plenty of other events also taking place.

The Thai government has declared Songkran festival as extended public holidays to enable the people to return to their hometown for family reunions, merit-making and reuniting with others in their community.

For the the do’s and don’ts during the Songkran Festival, please click HERE.